Jamie Weaver ~ West Virginia

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Jamie Weaver: “I grew up in rural West Virginia, and find myself deeply inspired by the complex geography, history, and culture of Appalachia. My artist books explore my Appalachian experience by embracing, questioning, and sometimes subverting the traditional folk stories, beliefs, and practices in which my childhood was steeped.”
   

JaneCHORDS
ByJamie Weaver
Chicago, Illinois: Jamie Weaver, 2018. Edition of 20 + 2 exhibition copies.

5.75 x 7"; 44 pages. Digitally printed. Secret Belgian binding in cloth boards with marbled paper pastedowns. Signed and numbered by the artist.

Jamie Weaver: "If you were an English major like me, you might be familiar with the mysterious Jane chord. Years ago, a literature professor shared with me the joy of piecing together the Jane chord of a novel: take the first few words and the last few words of a novel and string them together to create a new sentence or phrase. A Jane chord is, I imagine, rarely premeditated, and it isn't meant to hold up under intense literary analysis or critique, but it's always a pleasure to discover what secrets one may reveal about the narrative it encloses."

Colophon: "The type and illustrations were designed as a combined effort between text and image. Once the Jane chord was discovered, a typeface was chosen to represent either the aesthetic of the story of the time period in which it was written. Then, with a general idea in mind of the layout of the image, the type was set in InDesign and printed onto watercolor paper. Finally, the illustrations were drawn around the text using alcohol-based ink markers and Micron pens. ... The Jane chords appear in the order in which they were illustrated."
$135


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Jeimuzu and the Sea-Glass: A Folk Tale
By Jamie Weaver
Chicago, Illinois: Jamie Weaver, 2013. Edition of 30.

6 x 8"; 76 pages. Type set in Adobe Garamond Pro. Letterpress printed on Hahnemühle Ingres paper. Signatures sewn into a concertina spine. Bound in paper over boards. Signed and numbered on colophon.

Jamie Weaver wrote Jeimuzu and the Sea-Glass: A Folk Tale in 2009. She designed, illustrated, printed, and bound this edition of the story in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013 at the Columbia College Chicago Center for Book & Paper Arts. Her work on this project was supported by a Caxton Scholarship.

Jamie Weaver: "Jeimuzu and the Sea-Glass: A Folk Tale is an original short story about an old man’s sea journey and his surprising discovery on a distant shore. …[O]ne of the main characters, the old man Jeimuzu, bears the spirit of my late father, who was a traveler, farmer, artist, and adventurer who moved from rural Appalachia to live and work in Japan for the last twenty-five years of his life. The primary purpose of this project lies in my curiosity about the connections between Appalachian and Japanese cultures; by researching the cultural and geographical similarities between these two locations, I hope to discover a deeper connection between my father and me. The story contains vivid descriptions of landscape, and I use these descriptions to draw parallels between the natural environment in which I grew up with my father, and the environment in which I came to know him later in life."
$275

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Black Lung
By Jamie Weaver
Chicago, Illinois: Jamie Weaver, 2012. Edition of 6.

12 x 9"; 3 pages. Text letterpress printed from metal type, the respirator and lungs printed from polymer plates, and the clothesline scene from linocut. Gatefold cover.

Jamie Weaver: "Thinking about the struggles of my home state, I began to explore the consequences of destructive environmental practices that extend beyond the land to human casualties. Black Lung is a poem about black lung disease, a deadly consequence of working as a coal miner.

"I used the emblem of the respirator to signify the dirty air that miners breath into their lungs, often because the respirators are too uncomfortable to wear, because they are cumbersome and impede their ability to perform their jobs. The structure of the book mimics the action of digging because there are layers that need to be peeled back the deeper you go into the book. Once you dig all the way through, you find fresh clean air among the laundry lines. This represents the struggle to dig back out of the suffocating symptoms of black lung disease to find fresh air, or health. Sadly, for most afflicted with the disease, the only way to find relief is in death, which is what, for many, finally makes it a lovely day to go into the ground."

$50 (Last two copies)

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Jamie Weaver Out of Print Title:  
   

Faith Medicine
By Jamie Weaver
Chicago: Jamie Weaver, 2012. One-of-a-Kind.

10.25 x 10 x 2" custom clamshell box with sections for recipe cards, book, feathers, vials. Recipe Cards: 20 double-sided cards, 9 x 5"; letterpress printed. Book: 3 x 4", 21 pages; exposed binding; cloth over boards; feather tipped on front cover. Bottles: .5" diameter, 2.4" high, screw-cap top, 5 examples. Clamshell box: covered in red book cloth; paper lining; red ribbon lifts for book and cards; paper separator insert for example bottles.

Jamie Weaver: "After recently attending the Mildred Haun Conference on Appalachian Studies, I became intrigued by a presentation on traditional homemade folk remedies. This triggered childhood memories of rambling through the woods with my father on our West Virginia farm to dig ginseng and sassafras roots for making tea. Now that my father is gone, I attempt here to acquaint myself with homemade folk remedies as a way of reconstructing memories of my father and healing my grief over his untimely death. Everyone has faith in something: a higher power, the human spirit, a cure. In Faith Medicine, I wrestle with the following questions: To what extent can a remedy truly heal us? Is it less painful to hold on to memories, or to purge them from our system? I think that if something heals us, it is largely because we choose to believe that it does."

Each recipe card has an herbal recipe on one side with an associated memory of the artist's father on the other side. The accompanying book contains photos of Weaver's father through the years. The introduction to the book of images is the recipe to aid in grief.

Place a feather under your pillow and let
moonlight shine on your face as you sleep.
In the morning, release the feather into the
wind and the painful memories will be gone.

(SOLD)


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Faith Medicine
By Jamie Weaver
Chicago, Illinois: Jamie Weaver, 2012. Edition of 15.

5.75 x 9 x .635"; 20 cards. Letterpress printed recipe cards. Laid in stiff cover with velcro closure. Contains one glass vial of an "elixir" of various herbs and spices in colored water.

Jamie Weaver: "After recently attending the Mildred Haun Conference on Appalachian Studies, I became intrigued by a presentation on traditional homemade folk remedies. This triggered childhood memories of rambling through the woods with my father on our West Virginia farm to dig ginseng and sassafras roots for making tea. Now that my father is gone, I attempt here to acquaint myself with homemade folk remedies as a way of reconstructing memories of my father and healing my grief over his untimely death. Everyone has faith in something: a higher power, the human spirit, a cure. In Faith Medicine, I wrestle with the following questions: To what extent can a remedy truly heal us? Is it less painful to hold on to memories, or to purge them from our system? I think that if something heals us, it is largely because we choose to believe that it does."

Each recipe card has an herbal recipe on one side with an associated memory of the artist's father on the other side.

Recipe for Flu

Boneset (Eupatorium Perfoliatum)
Use 1 1/2 tsp. dried herb (stem, leaves, and flower) for
each cup of water. Steep for 15 minutes. Sweeten
liberally with honey to counter the bitter taste. Drink
1/2 cup hot tea every hour, at least 5 times a day to
relieve symptoms.

Memory of her being with her father when she had flu like symptoms.

My dad and I took a trip to Hawaii over winter break one year when I was in high school. I felt sick to my stomach after the flight, so I took some Pepto-Bismol once we checked into our hotel. I threw up the Pepto-Bismol on the floor, and the cleaning lady was mad because it was a new hotel and I'd left a bright pink stain on the carpet.

(SOLD)


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Going Home
By Jamie Weaver
Chicago, Illinois: Jamie Weaver, 2011. One-of-a-Kind.

7.5 x 9"; 10 pages. Accordion structure. Four double-page pop-ups. Bound in paper over boards.

Jamie Weaver: "Going Home is a nostalgic road trip in accordion book form. It speaks of my experiences as an ex-Appalachian longing for the country landscape I hold so dear, and finding that the reality of going home rarely lives up to the expectations built up in my memory. Often, the truth of an experience appears less colorful than the idyllic scene painted in our minds; I try to convey this feeling with a black and white palette throughout the book. Going Home focuses on the environmental issues that plague West Virginia, such as deforestation and water pollution as a result of coal mining, a stark and sobering vision of home."
(SOLD)


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Selective Memory
By Jamie Weaver
Chicago, Illinois: Jamie Weaver, 2012. One-of-a-Kind.

7 x 10 x 2" clamshell box containing pen, notebook, instruction sheet, 28 game tiles. In black cloth clamshell box with title on lid. Notebook: 5.75 x 8.75", 74 leaves; commercial casebound hardcover blank book; one two-page handwritten entry by the artist. Tiles: 3 x 3"; 28 double sided; digital printing; images on one side, pattered design on reverse. Instruction sheet: family picture on one side; instructions for playing on reverse. Box: covered in black book cloth; lift-out sectioned tray; paper title label on lid.

Jamie Weaver: "Selective Memory proposes a new method of grieving by treating grief as a game that must be played. This work was designed as a closed-network mail art piece to be circulated among the artist’s family and friends, but could easily be adapted for other grieving communities. In Selective Memory, participants assume the roles of players in a game similar to the classic game Memory. As players progress through the game, they are asked to participate in their small community of fellow players by sharing knowledge and memories of a deceased loved one. The artist’s indirect role in the game is to facilitate a connection between her experiences with grief over her father’s death and the similar experiences of the players as they engage with the game pieces that bear their own likenesses or the likenesses of friends and family members who were present at his memorial service.

"For the players, performing these acts of discovery and knowledge-making aids in recalling and processing a communal event that was experienced differently by each participant, and as a result, builds a shared experience. In addition, the winner of the game is granted the privilege of documenting his or her memories of the deceased in the notebook and passing the game along for other friends and family members to play. The notebook acts as a site on which to build a new collective ‘body’ to stand in memoriam for the one that has been lost."
(SOLD)


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Page last update: 09.24.18

   
  
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